PezCycling News - What's Cool In Road Cycling : PEZ’s Own Ottolock Cut Test

tech n spec
PEZ’s Own Ottolock Cut Test
After so many comments in my First Look video (see link below) about how easy it is to cut the Ottolock bicycle lock, I decided to take a pair of snips to it and see if I could cut this lock myself.

• See my Ottolock First Look Video here.
• If you still want to, buy it at Amazon here.

Click the video to see how I cut the Ottolock, or click here to see more at the PEZ Youtube Channel.


If you'd prefer to read instead of watch - here the transcript of my video:
Interestingly, my most watched video was a small review I did of this item right here called the Ottolock. I posted this video about a year and a half ago, and in that time, it's been viewed 34,000 times. It's been watched over about 50,000 minutes of view time, which is pretty good.

And the interesting thing about this particular lock and this particular video is, well, the general like rate on Pez videos across the channel is quite high, somewhere in the 85% range. This particular video has got my most amount of views, but the least amount of general acceptance.

In other words, I've got about a 50/50 rate of people going, "Hey, Pez, like the video," versus, "Hey, Pez, this one's a stinker. It sucks." It's collected more comments than any other video I've done, and most of the comments are kind of negative really. People are are pretty up in arms about this video and about this lock. They think this thing is a sham. And mostly because it's been proven on YouTube that this thing's pretty easy to cut by a guy by the name of The Lock-picking Lawyer, who's got a pretty cool channel where he picks locks. It took him about two seconds to cut this thing with a pair of tin snips.

So people are really worked up about this, from what I can tell. I'm reading some comments here. "You don't even need to push the button, and you can just pull the band straight out of the lock. Junk." I have not had that experience myself, but perhaps he has. Here's one, "This thing is absolute junk, and no one, absolutely no one should believe this crap video." Ouch.

Some of the misunderstanding that may have fueled some of these passionate responses has been context, and I do talk about this in the video. I'm going to leave the video up here so you can watch it. This lock is intended for, you're on a ride, you want something light you can take with you, but you want to stop for a coffee at the end of the group ride.

I've been using it for several months, and I have not had any bikes stolen. I have not had this thing snipped by thieves or anything like that. But in fairness, when I use this, I'm sitting in the coffee shop nearby with one eyeball on my bike. So I never would leave this say on a college campus where I don't see the bike for three or four hours, because, I mean, right there a recipe for bye, bye bike. But the intention of this lock is for light securing of your bike. Short trips, you're not going to be leaving it unattended for a long period of time.

But what I want to do, I'm going to bust out a pair of cheap tin snips and I'm going to try and cut this thing in half myself, and see what kind of results we get. We're putting it on video, and you will see the same results I get. So let's get busy with some snips on this thing and see what kind of damage we can do.

Alright, here we are. We are at the Pez test bench. As it's going to be today. I'm about to make an attempt at cutting through the Ottolock with a couple of different things here. This is some snips that we have already seen used by ... The Lock-picking Lawyer has successfully cut through the Ottolock with those. I've also got these smaller snips I want to start out with, just for the heck of it, to see if I can actually get through this thing with a much smaller pair of scissors, and just to find out how quickly and easily we can cut through this thing. But let's get on with it, shall we?We'll put this here, we'll grab these, and let's get busy. Here we go, folks.

There, well, I am already through the plastic coating. Oh yeah, here we go. No, I'm not getting ... I'm not able to cut through the inside with these little crappy ones.

Okay, so let's bust out these guys and see how they do. All right. And once you ... There you go. What do you know? That was, well, that was pretty easy to get through the Ottolock.

So now that we've got this thing snipped in half, it took us a couple of seconds. Yes, in fact it is easy to cut through this thing, as we have seen. And now I have also done it myself, so I'm not, I'm no longer trying to tell you anything that I haven't actually done myself.

Nevertheless, I have used this lock successfully when I ride and I go for a coffee, and I will continue to use it, because, quite frankly, it's a good little security device for the bike. It's light, it stows away easily. It doesn't take up a lot of space. And it is a deterrent from somebody just walking away with your bike.

Now, I don't know how many people are out there walking around with cutting devices like this, but quite honestly, when I go for a bike ride and I'm getting a coffee, I still have my bike in my eyesight anyways. I never leave it somewhere where I can't find it. Half the time, like a lot of guys I ride with, we just pile our bikes together. We don't actually even lock them. We just make sure we're sitting near them. So this is better than that. It's better than nothing, For 50 bucks, you're going to have to decide if you want to have this kind of security on your bike or not. I'll leave that up to you.

But I hope this satisfies all of the people who've been leaving comments about my last video about what this lock can do. So there you go, I've cut it. And I'm not saying that this thing is impossible to cut through, because I just did it myself. So hopefully that satisfies you.

And, well, let's move on.

 


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